Legislative

Newest Laws and Effective Dates

Posted on May 23, 2018

New Laws that go into effect July 1, 2018
Governor Haslam’s Opioid Reform Bill is now Public Chapter 1039
Click on this infographic to view the prescriptions requirements for different days supply and the patients and prescribers that are exempt from these requirements.
Public Chapter 1015 prohibits the “gag clauses” in PBM contracts that have prevented pharmacists from discussing lower cost options with patients.
Public Chapter 615 Authorizes pharmacists to dispense emergency situations.
Public Chapter 617 establishes that a medication therapy management program is “pharmacist-provided”.
Public Chapter 978 Buprenorphine Clinic Restrictions
SB 2258/HB 1832 has passed but has not been signed into law yet.  However, it is scheduled to become effective 7/1/2018 and will make Gabapentin a Schedule V Controlled Substance.
New Laws effective January 1, 2019
Public Chapter 838  Requires PBMs to obtain a license through the state if doing business in Tennessee
Public Chapter 1007 will allow for the Partial Filling of Controlled Substances.

End of Session Summary for Tennessee

Posted on May 01, 2018

What Passed?
PBM Licensing Through TN Dept of Commerce and Insurance (SB 1852/HB 1857)
Effective Date: January 1, 2019
Senate Sponsor(s): Haile, Crowe, Bell, Yager, Jackson, Reeves
House Sponsor(s): Powers, Matlock, Keisling, Weaver, Calfee, Terry
Summary:

Requires all pharmacy benefits managers (PBMs) to obtain licensure and renew biennially through the Tennessee Department of Commerce and Insurance (TDCI)
Requires PBMs to demonstrate that they are able to transact in this state, are financially responsible, and have not had a prior license denied or revoked within five (5) years of the date the license is sought.
Requires PBMs to provide TDCI with the person or entity’s name, address, telephone number, and website address.
Requires PBMs to notify TDCI within 60 days of any change in PBM information.

Tennessee

Posted on Feb 14, 2017

New Laws that go into effect July 1, 2018
Governor Haslam’s Opioid Reform Bill is now Public Chapter 1039
Click on this infographic to view the prescriptions requirements for different days supply and the patients and prescribers that are exempt from these requirements.
Public Chapter 1015 prohibits the “gag clauses” in PBM contracts that have prevented pharmacists from discussing lower cost options with patients.
Public Chapter 615 Authorizes pharmacists to dispense emergency situations.
Public Chapter 617 establishes that a medication therapy management program is “pharmacist-provided”.
Public Chapter 978 Buprenorphine Clinic Restrictions
SB 2258/HB 1832 has passed but has not been signed into law yet.  However, it is scheduled to become effective 7/1/2018 and will make Gabapentin a Schedule V Controlled Substance.
New Laws effective January 1, 2019
Public Chapter 838  Requires PBMs to obtain a license through the state if doing business in Tennessee
Public Chapter 1007 will allow for the Partial Filling of Controlled Substances.
 
2015 Legislative Summary for Tennessee
Analysis of Drug Disposal Program 2015
SPC lobbyist, John Williams, has prepared a preliminary list of bills introduced in Tennessee for 2015 which could impact you and your business.  Click 2015 Bills of Interest to SPC Members for bill numbers and Mr. Williams’ brief summaries of the bills’ intent.
Click Summary of 2014 Legislation of Interest to Pharmacists to see a summary of 2014 Final Legislation.

Click 2013 Final Legislative Summary how legislation stood in Tennessee at the end of the 2013 session.

Prescription Safety Act of 2016

Posted on Jun 03, 2016

In its continuing war against prescription drug abuse, the Haslam Administration has since 2012 been proposing and passing legislation designed to identify drug-seeking patients and providers that over-prescribe controlled drugs. Chapter 1002 of the Public Acts of 2016, known as the Tennessee Prescription Safety Act, re-wrote the sections of the Code passed in the last four years.

Pain Management Clinics

Posted on Jun 01, 2016

As a part of Tennessee’s effort to prevent prescription drug abuse, the General Assembly has imposed strict regulations on pain management clinics. In each legislative session since 2011, the legislature has “tightened the screws” on these clinics.